MS details

The schedule is available at https://www.conftool.com/iucr2020/

Science meets art: Crystallography and cultural heritage

Comments

The observation of symmetries is common in nature as in the scientific and artistic world. These are found in physics in multiple contexts, in mechanics (Kepler’s laws) in biology, geology and crystallography as well as in architectural and artistic human constructions. Originally the word symmetry is derived from the Latin ‘symmetria’, in turn derived from the Greek summetria ‘just measure, proportion’. It includes the meaning ‘regularity and harmony in the parts of an object’ when speaking of a work of art. For many years, the concept of symmetry was reduced to bilateral symmetry but later evolved to include the symmetry that maintains an invariant centre (point group symmetry), as well as the spatial symmetries that repeat a building motif in two- and three-dimensional space by translation (plane and space group symmetries, respectively). The study of symmetry has been an important part of the human endeavor in its perennial search for higher levels of appreciation and understanding of the physical world around us. In recent times, particularly among mathematicians, solid state scientists and artists, it has also inspired a myriad of attempts to interpret and recreate cultural manifestations based on mathematical concepts. The aim of this transdisciplinary microsymposium, which coincidently takes place in the city where Johannes Kepler wrote his Strena Seu de Nive Sexangula, is to provide a forum for the different perspectives interconnecting science and cultural heritage centered around Mathematics and Crystallography.

Chair persons

Name

Family

Institution

City

Country

Region

Sebastian

Bette

Sebastian Bette Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research

Stuttgart

Germany

ECA

David

Hradil

Czech Academy of Sciences

Rez u Prahy

Czech Republic

ECA

Sebastian

Bette

Max-Planck-Institute for Solid State Research

Stuttgart

Germany

ECA

 

Invited speakers

Name

Family

Institution

City

Country

Title

Emil

Makovický

University of Copenhagen

Copenhagen

Denmark

The quasiperiodic patterns of the western Islamic ornamental art

Jean Marc

Castera

Paris

France

Does Persian geometric flowers love quasicrystals?